Browsing All posts tagged under »Facebook«

OFF-GRID: all the ways your personal data is collected…

November 2, 2011

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Off-grid blogger TECHSTAR offers a somewhat depressing list of all the ways personal data is collected from everyday people. The article begins with the infamous Scott McNealy quote “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.”

Verizon comes clean about on-selling

November 1, 2011

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LINK to Houston news LINK to FOX Verizon in the US recently came clean about on-selling personal data to third parties for marketing. The data being sold is collected through cell-phones and smart-phones to give a person’s location, downloaded smartphone apps and websites visited, as well as age and gender. The public statement says: “these […]

Digital inheritance?

November 1, 2011

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link (Digital Trends) A recent survey raises the issue of digital inheritance, with people leaving the passwords to personal information and data in their wills. This includes photos, videos, music and access to facebook accounts and other webpages. Although the survey was targeted at Brits, it would be unsurprising to find it happening here in NZ. […]

The strange reality of “People-searching” (US)

September 7, 2011

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Spokeo, Intelius and ZabaSearch are three websites that allow you to search a wealth of information on anyone in the US. Searching my first and last name on ZabaSearch (free) offered over 1000 results from the US, an initialled middle name brought the number down to 64, most of whom had phone number, date of […]

Stephen Bell Opinion Piece on Google+ name criteria

August 17, 2011

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Computer World writer Stephen Bell (NZ) takes a look at the way Google+ restricts usernames to something that sounds like a real name. “The company has displeased some potential users by insisting they use their real names or at least a name by which they are well-known and which looks like a conventional name.” Interesting […]

NZ Herald: Smartphones test for new privacy law

August 8, 2011

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LINK “Any site on the web could personalise itself to react to where you are as well as who you know,” says Coates. Combine automatic “geotagging” (geographical identification) with blog posts, photos, tweets and so on, and suddenly you have “a hyper local sense” of what people are thinking – “what everyone in Nebraska thinks […]